Category Archives: Books

Frankenstein: A tale for our times?

Frankenstein cover © Wordsworth Classics

Like Victor Frankenstein, I toiled for many months over my creation (although thankfully mine didn’t involve any corpses). Unlike Victor I had no need to “turn with loathing from my occupation”, although I was “urged on by an eagerness which perpetually increased”.My creation, my undergraduate dissertation on Mary Shelley’s novel did indeed occupy me and when I submitted it I felt somewhat bereft, as did the author when handing her manuscript to the publisher  “for I have developed an affection for it”.

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Frankenstein – A Contemporary Tale

Like Victor Frankenstein, I toiled for many months over my creation (although thankfully, mine didn’t involve any corpses). Unlike Victor I had no need to “turn with loathing from my occupation”, although I was “urged on by an eagerness which perpetually increased”. Continue reading

Bedtime Stories – Who Gains?

Is reading to our children being lost as a sharing experience? Recent research shows that parents would welcome encouragement in reading to their children, while apparently 44% of parents admit that they don’t read a bedtime story to their offspring.   Surely I’m not alone in feeling dismay at these statistics?

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World Book Night – C’Mon Everybody!

What a truly innovative idea – one of those ‘wish I’d dreamed that one up’ moments.  Never mind that I didn’t and let’s celebrate Jamie Byng’s initiative.  

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Mind The Gap

The debate rages about the library closures and with the wonderful 20/20 vision of hindsight, we should have seen the it coming. Continue reading

Notes In The Margins

I adore books. All books. No matter what the subject matter, I love their feel, their smell, the promise of what’s contained within, the delight of discovery.

I love being in bookshops, in the library, immersed in the written word.

It’s this enduring love affair that’s aroused my curiosity about the early conditioning of childhood and how we overturn it – or not.

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